Posts Tagged ‘quezon province’

Around two weeks ago, Vlad mentioned that he was planning on a weekend getaway with his High School friends. Since I was also free, I happily tagged along.

They initially planned on going to Cagbalete but a storm signal was raised on Thursday and the Coast Guard were not allowing boats to sail off. Everyone else was hell bent on hanging out at the port and wait til the Coast Guard raises the sailing ban. However, given my previous mishap with Quezon’s Coast Guard, I insisted we settle with a different beach. Our Plan B was Kuwebang Lampas and that is where we spent our Saturday night at.

We broke camp early on Sunday and after a very filling brunch at a floating restaurant, we made our way to Kamay ni Hesus. They persuaded me to climb up to the very top (never again LOL) and then we rewarded ourselves with Pancit Habhab at Buddy’s (Lucban.)

I managed to capture most of the weekend on video and condensed it in a 4 minute montage. Check it out below.

 

Have you ever been camping? Where is your favorite camping spot?

 

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Borawan is a play on two words – Boracay and Palawan. It’s an island named so because, as some people claim, it has white sand reminiscent of Boracay and rock formations the same as Palawan’s limestone cliffs. If one gets the chance to have the Boracay and Palawan experience in one at a measly price, one grabs it.

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My friends and I boarded a bus bound to Lucena, got off at the Grand Terminal. Got on a mini bus and alighted at the town of Padre Burgos where we got on tricycles that brought us to the port. From there, we rented a boat that would take us to Borawan Beach. Someone gave us a tip that people usually do the Borawan to Dampalitan route so we decided to go against the flow of people and camp out at Dampalitan Island instead.

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Upon arrival to the island, we pitched our tents and settled down for the day.

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In all fairness, Dampalitan Island’s sand could pass up as Boracay’s shores from afar. While the sun is shining its brightest, the white sand seems to glow it almost hurts the eyes.

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After lunch and a quick nap, the water level went down low enough to reveal a little sandbar. We walked on the sandbar and took photos farther out into the sea. That entertained us for about 30 minutes until it got too hot to be enjoyable. We went back under the shade and napped some more while waiting for the sun to go down. When it got a little cooler, we explored the opposite side of the shore and came across some sea friends.

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We watched the sun set and it was beautiful. It was made better by the absence of a big crowd. Guess going against the norm paid off, after all.

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When it got dark, we cooked and had our dinner. We built a fire and drank and danced around it. We also roasted marshmallows for our s’mores. It was a great night. 🙂

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The next day, our boat came by and brought us to Borawan Beach.

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I had to agree that the cliffs do resemble the limestone formations in Palawan albeit being miniature compared to the real thing. When we got to the island, there was a group of rock climbers uhmmmmm climbing the rocks LOLOLOL. We contented ourselves in climbing on top the less intimidating ones and swimming around the clear waters. We didn’t really do much at Borawan Island and I have to say that I liked Dampalitan better.

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Borawan is being marketed better than what it actually is. But if you’re looking for a new beach to explore this summer, it is still worth the try.

As mentioned in a previous post, our trip to Polillo Island took an unexpected detour when we were not allowed by the Coast Guard to cross the seas on a Good Friday. We tried a lot of options to bypass the Coast Guard, even hopped from one port to the other. Alas, everything was not working for us. As if some sort of force was trying to direct us somewhere else.

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While arguing with the Coast Guard on duty, we met a bunch of surfers who were also trying to get to Polillo that day. When every other option failed, they offered to take us back to a surf camp where they were staying at.

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We took a tricycle to The Pacific Recreation Kamp a.k.a. “The PaRK”. Apparently, it is a fairly popular place for surfers and non-surfers alike. The PaRK’s campground is covered in soft grass and shaded by trees. It is ideal for pitching tents – which is exactly what we did. We rented a tent and put it up near the fence facing a river. We took a very satisfying nap after a couple bottles of beer and we woke up energized and ready to explore the rest of the camp.

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Just beyond the fence is a river, actually an estuary. There were several boats docked and a blue boat was so perfectly set with the lush green mountains serving as its backdrop.

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To get to the main beach area where most of the people are, we needed to cross the river. It was easy to find the shallowest part in the daytime but believe me, things were totally different when we made our way back to camp when the sun set. High tide, dim moon light and a small dry bag is not a good combination. LOL.

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The beach does not boast of fine, white sand. Instead, the water is rather murky, tinted by the brownish sand. The part where the waves hit the shore is littered with smooth pebbles.

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Walking further ahead, the sand got finer and there were less scattered stones. For some reason, the waves were comparably smaller than other parts. It was crowded with families lounging around. These two boys seemed to be having the time of their lives.

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As per our surfer friends, the waves weren’t really huge that day. That didn’t seem to discourage anyone as there was still a good number of surfers playing in the water even when the sun was already going down. 

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Up further ahead is a more secluded area. It was much less crowded than all the other parts mainly because it takes quite a long walk to get here.

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After swimming and surfing, we decided to head back to camp as it was about to get dark. There are a lot of surfboards for rent at P200/hour or P500/half day. When we reached camp, we washed up and cooked a huge fish the surfers so graciously offered to us. We shared a simple yet sumptuous dinner with our new-found friends and retired to our respective tents early because we planned to catch the first trip to Polillo Island the next day.

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I was not able to take pictures of the main camp area as it was pretty crowded while we were there due to the Holy Week peak. No worries though because this is for sure not my last time at The PaRK.